The 6 Surefire Keys to Dominate Anything You Want

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My dad wouldn’t let me watch the TV show “Mr. Ed”. I wasn’t allowed to eat “Captain Crunch” cereal. I had pretty relaxed parents when I was little. I was allowed to do most things. But “Mr. Ed” was bad. And “Captain Crunch” was bad.

“Mr. Ed” was a TV show about a man who owned a talking horse. I never watched the show so I can’t tell you much more about it. But from what I gather, whenever he had problems with his wife, he’d go outside to his barn and talk to his horse, Ed, about his problems. My dad thought the show was sexist. “He would talk to his horse instead of his wife!” my dad would say. So that show was out.

“Captain Crunch” was out. As were “Fruit Loops”. “That cereal kills your brain,” my dad would say.

(Mr. Ed and Wilbur)

I now know that a lot of things are worse for your brain. I wish my brain had some brain cells killed sometimes. The cells filled with venom, that infect cells filled with lust or anger or greed or gossip. Cancerous pockets of mirage fill my head sometimes, filling me with anxiety or worry. Did “Captain Crunch” do that? Did Mr. Ed fill me with rape scene after rape scene in my teenage years?

Forget your brain for a second. Your brain is your enemy. You can only succeed if you are utterly stupid. If you are successful there’s going to be a brief moment when even your closest relatives think you’re “disturbed” or “paranoid” or belong in a mental institution. That’s when you know you are about to succeed. There are six components to success. Only one has to do with the brain, if at all:

A)     Enthusiasm. I told my 12 year old I don’t want her taking tap dancing lessons anymore. She’s been taking them for five years. She’s been in a dozen performances or more. She could really be good if she keeps going for it until she’s 18. Here’s the problem: she should already be really good at it. She should be great at it. Five or six years she’s been taking it. Never once have I seen her practicing at home or looking at youtube videos of great tap dancers. I took her to see the best tap dancer in the world once. She was happy to go with me and spend time with me. But she fell asleep in the show. The highlight of that evening was we went to eat dinner together. I heard the guy next to us propose to the girl he was with. I offered to take their picture. They smiled for it. Then the girl told him, quietly so she thought I wouldn’t hear, “no”. that was the highlight of my evening at least.

The problem is Josie has no enthusiasm for it. I can tell when an entrepreneur has enthusiasm for something. If all he’s talking about is how big the exit could be, then he’s a loser. If he loves the subtleties and intricacies of the field he’s in, then I can tell he’s a winner. For me, what I have enthusiasm right now for is writing this blog. I have enthusiasm for nothing else. I read and write and think about this blog 20 hours a day. My entire day’s schedule revolves around it.

It’s hard to cultivate enthusiasm. But unfortunately its the first absolute necessary ingredient of success in a field. By following the Daily Practice I describe, you’ll find what you are enthusiastic about, even if it takes a little bit of time.

B. Perseverance. I’ve been without a real job since 1997. 14 years. Some years I’ve made money. Some years I’ve lost so much money I deserve to be taken out back and shot in the head like a war criminal for all the lives I’ve hurt or destroyed by failing to deliver. But I’m proud of the fact that I keep getting up. I succeeded too early. I was destined to lose everything. And I’ve done that more than once. Hopefully my perseverance pays off. Hopefully this time I’ve learned how to stand up straight and keep walking into the sun until it finally takes me away on the chariot of the gods.

C. Courage. I had a safe job, I was going to rise up, I was making a decent salary, life was good. But I quit. And took a big chance. On who? On the Wu-Tang Clan. And they promptly forgot who I was. So I had to start again. And again. And again. And then I lost everything. So I had to start again. Then the IRS wanted to chat with me. So I had to start again. Oh, another chat. Let’s start again. Oh, someone already did that business. Lets start again. Or kick their asses even though they had a head start, even though it will cost me a lot of money. I’m sick of it. I’m tired of it. But I’ll kill you again if I have to.

D. Knowledge. I see a lot of pure garbage in the financial media space. I read a LOT of people who give stock tips. I can tell in just a few sentences who has done their research, who is getting paid to lie about a stock, who has never read the history of the game, studied the asset classes they claim they specialize in, studied the customer, studied the companies. I can tell. Because when the pool is shallow you quickly see the shit the little kids left at the bottom.

I can see it in blog writing as well. People who take it too easy and think the pageviews will come without the quality. The people who have never read a book in their life and then start blogging or even tweeting without creating any real value or even have an understanding of what value is. If you have enthusiasm for something then have to:

  • study the history
  • study the present
  • do it
  • study it from every angle
  • study all the masters who preceded you (if you want to truly master the field)
  • get mentored if you can
  • and if you can’t, get virtually mentored. Picture the person you most want to be like in your chosen field and every day ask, “what would this person do today”.

(too much time in tech meetups, not enough time for real work)

E) Clarity. People often ask me, “if I show you my idea then you have to sign a non-disclosure agreement.” I would never do that. If you believe in your idea, if you have enthusiasm for it, if you’ve built the knowledge and have confidence that you’ve built that knowledge, then you will always have more clarity in your business then I will. A million decisions have to be made correctly in order for a business to succeed. And that’s out of 2 million. If I make 49% of them correctly and you make 51% of them correctly, then you will destroy me. If you have clarity in your field then you’ll get your 51%.

In other words, you don’t need a non-disclosure agreement from me to destroy me if you have Clarity.

F) Flexibility. Not everything works out right. Things change every day. In a relationship, in a novel (writing one right now so this is where my mind is at), in a business, in parenting. Every single day. You can’t attach yourself to results. If you attach your mind to the idea of Google buying your company and not only do they refuse but they then create the exact product to compete with you after looking you over from top to bottom (and this has happened to me before) then you need to be more flexible. You need to develop aloofness from the final result of your efforts. The process itself will bring reward. You don’t need to think about it. Just keep pursuing it and have faith in the process. Your efforts are “religious” and the exit is a product of your faith. This post has some advice on how to diversify your efforts and keep flexible.

 

Everyone in NY sits around and talks fancy. They go to tech meetups, they go to meetings where they get nothing done and the meetings last for hours. They read the news, they make the news, they blog, they tweet – everyone is talking and gossiping and slandering other entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, reporters. Everyone’s a big shot who knows everyone. Very few people get things done. Stick to the six things above and nothing else and you’ll get everything done you had ever hoped for.

Mister Ed: What do you say we go out riding and pick up a couple of fillies?
Wilbur Post: I’m not a horse, remember?
Mister Ed: Too bad, we could have a ball double dating.

Is that really so sexist?

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  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_OTAZAD4MZMGPRHWPEMAVGJULV4 Q

    You’re not Chinese though, they will copy. NDA necessary.

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      Its ok to copy me. I give away for free. I’m the worst information slut. 

  • Anonymous

    Love the post, James.

  • http://twitter.com/kamalravikant Kamal Ravikant

    Another great one, lots of hard-earned truths here.  

  • http://twitter.com/kamalravikant Kamal Ravikant

    Saw this 3 minute talk by Richard St. John, “Secrets of success in 8 words,” thought of you:

    http://youtu.be/Y6bbMQXQ180

  • Sean

    Thanks for virtually mentoring me today.  I often ask “What would James do?”

    Are you still going to be on TV tomorrow? 

  • My_comment

    One of your best posts, keep it up!

  • Al F

    awesome-coming from a 22 yr old who has been the typecast middle-white class family, college-partying accounting major who now works on wallst and is gradually working up the conformities of society ladder, youre perspective definitely opens up my mind to the possibility that i can eventually do what i want and use the creative side of my brain that i know i have…i 1000000% agree with Enthusiasm as #1-gotta figure out what to be enthusiastic about though, first…keep posting man-love it

  • Michael

    It usually takes about 10 years of intense practice/work to become great at anything worthwhile.

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      10 years with all of the above.. I know plenty of people who spent 10 years with maybe 5 of the 6 and got nowhere. 

      • Mary P.

        As I recall from Outliers, it takes about 10,000 hours to get good if you have a bit of talent. That translates into about 5 years of full-time “work” at it (persistence). The premise of the book is that Outliers really aren’t that–Bill Gates had great advantages, such as access to computers during high school when computers were locked up in machine rooms.
        Great post. I’d love to see you address “burn out” that comes and goes with enthusiasm–and plagues me at times. 

  • Jeff

    Mr. Ed was a funny show. Catch the re-runs.

  • LE

    Do you think that your advices are universal? I ask because I’m from Colombia and mentality and everyday problems are so different that it seems to be more difficult to implement what you’re saying. (But since I read you I decided not to see the news, and it works perfectly for me).
    Is great to read you.

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      I definitely think its universal. 

  • Anonymous

    James, just started reading your blog and I’m finding it fascinating. And great contributions on TWiST.

    Did the woman really say no? Wasn’t he crushed and stormed out?

  • http://RicNunez.com Ric

    I like your point about your daughter and your observation about her lack of enthusiasm.
    Enthusiasm can also help to overcome a lot of bad days too.

    Also, agreed with your Courage point, is the main reason that makes
    people to stick with a mediocre life instead of making a change.

    ps: I was watching fast money and I saw Douglas Kass making a comment
    about his prediction about the dow for next year and also laughing about
    your prediction of dow at 20k. That reminded me to come and read your post today.

  • C. Martin

    Great blog again. Your good entries make my day. This is going to one of those posts I print out so I can read again!

  • Anonymous

    I was not supposed to watch The Wild Wild West. Remember
    James West in those tight little pants? He made my girlish heart go pitter pat.
    My parents thought that that show was sexist and it was. I watched it anyway. I
    Dream of Jeannie, and Daktari, also. Lucky Charms have Captain Crunch and Froot
    Loops beat by a mile. The intoxicating Lucky Charm soup that resulted after all
    of the cereal was consumed and there was nothing left but milk was
    indescribable. The only thing was, you had to make sure that you didn’t eat all
    of the marshmallows right off the bat and left enough to get through the entire
    bowl. Brain cells lost for a life well lived. James, you don’t know what you
    missed. You have my sympathies.

  • TripleB

    It’s hard to dominate something and not end up hating it.  I keep coming back to the example of Andre Agassi.  Dominated tennis in his day, hates the game with a passion.

  • Ted

    And my Mom forbade me to watch Dr Queen because after seeing an episode with my sister, I used my Lego bricks to build gallows for hanging Indians. You know, a proper one, with trap door.

  • http://www.736hundred.tumblr.com 736hundred

    This is great, I am going to pass it on to our new team. I believe we have all 6 at our core. :) Thank you.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FVAXY5OZTYZ2D35XXYJLNEJVBI Bullocks

    Most creative entrepenures don’t get the Non-Disclosure Agreement thing.  They are always afraid someone will steal their ideas.

    But ideas aren’t worth the waiter-pad paper that you write them on.  The only thing that’s worth something is the “doing.”  Execution is priceless.

  • Joey Buttafuco

    “I see a lot of pure garbage in the financial media space. I read a LOT of people who give stock tips. . . . I can tell. Because when the pool is shallow you quickly see the shit the little kids left at the bottom.”

    Kettle calling the pot black. Most of the garbage comes from people like you, who make outlandish claims like BAC doubling by the end of the year when it was 15 in April. You contribute to the idiocy in the financial media space.

    • Kjp712

      Amy said Hi !

  • http://www.parmcharm.com karen parmelee

    Great post James – more of that sure-fire sense of making it happen. I will be in NYC on Thursday. Email me if you want to get a coffee!  ;  )

  • firstbase613

    No More Bojangles?
    I would agree that if my kid required a chunk of my time for their hobby, or required great expense, then their lack of enthusiasm would have me consider ending the investment. In your case, tap dancing might be what your daughter finds relaxing, letting off some energy, getting out of the house or just a form of exercise that keeps her feeling energetic. If she is not late to lessons, not losing her equipment, not showing ambivalence about the time and commitment, why end the lessons due to lack of enthusiasm? Why be so goal oriented? Do tap dancing lessons come with a required end result of being a great tap dancer?
    Western – Greek world view would say, ‘yes’! But an Eastern person would have great difficulty in understanding why “doing” must be acommpanied with a demand for results. Let her tap dance because she likes to. Does she have to want to be great at it in order to earn the right to do it? As a fellow practicioner of Yoga, I ask you James to reconsider your decision in your quiet moments of meditation. 

  • B/S Bagger

    Had a stupid primitive sicilian aunt harmless but would utter things without thinking first . So at our house as kids watching mr ed once she looked to my dad and said ” sammy you know the horse doesnt really talk”, to which he replied ” no he’s is only the actor because he is handsome but they have an ugly mule behind stage doing the talking”. I think she paused and thought about it doubt she caught the gist of it.

    Oh i found out later they use to smear peanut butter in ed’s mouth to get him to lip sink to the mule hag.

  • http://www.bclund.com bclund

    I think “B” is the one that can’t be done without.  You may skip by without a couple of the others, but without perseverance, you are toast.

  • http://twitter.com/maximtitov Maxim Titov

    So. Amazingly. True. Thanks for sharing your knowledge, James :)

  • http://twitter.com/maximtitov Maxim Titov

    So. Amazingly. True. Thanks for sharing your knowledge, James :)

  • kumar vivek

    Another great post James, flexibility and perseverance is they key. Loved this-“I’m sick of it. I’m tired of it. But I’ll kill you again if I have to.”

  • 1000zahia

    James, how would you master a foreign language?

  • Rod

    One of your all time best posts, James. Keep up the obsessive writing man!

  • Anonymous

    My Mom’s nemeses were comic books and motorcycles, both of which were strictly forbidden. She’d been influenced by the great comic-book scare of the ’50s, and feared comics would distract us from ‘real’ books. That she thought motorcyles dangerous was not unreasonable, yet she smoked herself into an early grave. People are a mystery.

  • Fanof James

    Instant follower, now that I’ve been introduced to you by your appearance on CNBC this morning.

  • Anonymous

    Hopefully this time I’ve learned how to stand up straight and keep walking into the sun until it finally takes me away on the chariot of the gods!Amen dude

    What a post really hit home, especially your comments on NYC….
    Everyone in NY sits around and talks fancy.

    I grew up here I remember skateboarding through LES at 13 (i think it’s called something fancier now) , getting chased by cops down Water past Wall for skating on the tiles heading to the ferry, to then cold calling for stock brokers on Broad that were getting chased by cops when I was 18.
    Then at 21 starting a business with a real friend, we opened up in NJ to get focused and cheaper rent. We didn’t go to a meeting in the city for at least 2 years, we spent 12-16 hours a day in the office working.

    Funny how life works but now NYC well I don’t know what happened  but there was always this high respect and loyalty to friends in the city that didn’t talk shit, like that’s what made us different we kept our fucking NYC word. Wu Tang…My word is my bond kid!

    Now it’s weird everyone has so much time to chat and have “meetings” and something starts happening sometimes but the people that were supposed to be involved were not really “friends” so we thought hmm maybe, like what WTF!? Does anyone make any actual money doing this, who is “paying” for all these meetings and where is the ROI. You made me think about how many of these type of meetings I have been a part of I am exhausted just thinking about it, wastes energy.

    Name dropping has become out of control in the tech and advertising space especially  in NYC it’s like 25% of a meeting is so I know so and so (I am not going to lie James, I name drop you from time time just from receiving one email reply from you :) ) 
    You did inspire me to the point of starting to build new software and start hiring a new sales team, I am very fucking grateful and I know it was just a couple of lines in an email but I thought a couple of words were a solid business plan starting point

    Anyway I am babbling and I am not a blogger so I probably am the only one that will know what this post says after the first few lines but man you hit a nerve and it caused me to vent.
    No more meetings I have too much work to do. I wonder if anyone really liked Mr. Ed or just knew the theme song… I talk to my dog about my wife so your dad may consider me sexist as well.
    Thanks for the great job you are doing.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1496032428 Jody Moore

    Loved this read. Read this morning in the gym. People were looking at me as they passed wondering what I was smiling about

  • http://HireHassan.com Hassan

    Great post James! I really connected to the parts about enthusiasm and flexibility. It’s really easy to go out on a limb and not care what people think when you realize they’re far too busy thinking about more important things….like what you think of them. Funny how it works that way, huh?

  • http://twitter.com/kamalravikant Kamal Ravikant

    Ben Horowitz had a great post on the most difficult ceo skill – managing your own psychology: http://tcrn.ch/ghrSGV

    That’s something we hardly ever get taught.  Your daily practice post definitely helps with that challenge.  Does enthusiasm include being positive?  There’s been times when I’ve felt like a boxer taking punches from all sides and haven’t felt enthusiastic or positive.  But have carried forward (b).

    I guess what I’m wondering is, how does one keep full speed ahead on all 6 at all times?

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      I think at the core is the daily practice so you know when you are being punched in the face that you are as healthy as possible in every way. if you aren’t healthy, AND THEN are punched in the face, its harder to get off the floor. Boxers train for a year, for 9 3-minute rounds. And each one of those 3 minute rounds are the toughest 3 minutes of their life. they might love boxing, they might be enthusiastic, etc etc but those 3 minutes when everything is being thrown at you are tough. But they get through: 
       – they love the sport 
       – they put in the proper preparation and they KNOW IT. Knowing that you’ve done everything you can in advance keeps you going. 
       – they have a team in their corner. We have friends, loved ones, family, colleagues that are all in our corner and want us to succeed. 
       – and sometimes you just look up at a higher power (or whatever you want to call it) and say, “you gotta help me here because its bigger than me” and this is where the spiritual part of the practice comes in, building up that constant communication so that when you need it, its there and you are confident in it. 

      To a cynic, this can all sound corny. But those people (I think) have a harder time finding methods to survive in difficult periods. Had breakfast yesterday with the subject of an earlier blog post of mine (thoughts on turning 43). He’s 83, had a day planned with meetings from dawn til night and was happy as ever. He always reminds me “Positive mental attitude, even in the 70s when times were bad I wouldn’t get stressed.” 

      I personally get stressed. But I put in the time to stay healthy and that helps. 

      • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

        There’s another important point in that success, by itself, has many negatives attached to it: 
        – its often painful
        – stressful
         – it often causes one to do things they don’t want to do
         – the end result is not always what is expected
         – there’s a lot of anxiety with the failure that happens on the road to success
         – there’s the insecurity that happens along the way

        All of these things are negative attributes of what could be success. The key is to balance that out with other things that aren’t the usual definitions of success. For instance, it would be successful for me if I could look at a stock market down 500 pts and not feel a single thing, one way or the other. Imagine if I can do that wth most things in my life. That would be great. 

        Or if I can choose to be happy exactly when i want to. And at other times, just get things done (no need to be ALWAYS happy). That would be pretty successful (along with the usual definitions, that might have more negative things attached to it). 

        • Brian Balk

          Everyone has a daily practice – may be good or bad, planned or unconscious – made up of countless habits.  Since habits become unconscious and automatic, it pays to develop good ones.  Make a habit of noticing beauty – even if it’s a snowflake on your car that just slid off an icy road into a ditch; or the amazing life of an ant that is crawling on your breakfast plate.  Make a habit to breathe properly and to feel a little bit of joy / life / love / growth / energy / inspration on every breath.  Say something bad happens.  Worst thing you can imagine.  If you’re still alive, then you have to move on, you’re either growing or dying.  The next breath, and the next, habits can help you start building yourself up again without even thinking about it.  Easy to say, though – not so easy to do.

  • http://twitter.com/kamalravikant Kamal Ravikant

    Ben Horowitz had a great post on the most difficult ceo skill – managing your own psychology: http://tcrn.ch/ghrSGV

    That’s something we hardly ever get taught.  Your daily practice post definitely helps with that challenge.  Does enthusiasm include being positive?  There’s been times when I’ve felt like a boxer taking punches from all sides and haven’t felt enthusiastic or positive.  But have carried forward (b).

    I guess what I’m wondering is, how does one keep full speed ahead on all 6 at all times?

  • TD

    I disagree with your perception of your daughter’s attitude towards tap dance.  I, like most from my eastern Indian culture, dutifully went to music and dance lessons, and mostly hated it.  I only liked the part where I could dress up and look pretty on stage.  You can correctly conclude that I had no passion for dancing that would make me dominate the field.  But I really became passionate about it later as an adult.  I don’t and can’t dance anymore, but when I see someone do it on stage or TV or on the streets, I am mesmerized.  I can follow the steps, the dips and the highs, the emotions they are trying to convey.  It is magical.  My guess is I never would have developed enough mental capacity to enjoy dance without those grueling, unwilling practices I did as a child.  Perhaps I will never be an expert in dancing, but it brings me joy anyways.  My mind keeps dancing and choreographing to snippets of music.  Perhaps tap dancing for your daughter will remain a joyful activity.  Perhaps you need to ask her if she at all wants to dominate in this activity.  Not every pursuit needs to be dominated. 

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      You might be right. If she were in total control of it then thats fine. But since she often has to be driven to lessons and there are other hassles then its got to be something where the odds are even greater that she has a passion throughout her life for. You were lucky that you developed that passion despite initial non-enthusiasm. 

      • Mark May

        No luck was involved in developing a passion (despite initial non-enthusiasm).

      • Mark May

        No luck was involved in developing a passion (despite initial non-enthusiasm).

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      You might be right. If she were in total control of it then thats fine. But since she often has to be driven to lessons and there are other hassles then its got to be something where the odds are even greater that she has a passion throughout her life for. You were lucky that you developed that passion despite initial non-enthusiasm. 

  • Meatbone9

    I was at a meeting with one of the founders of Priceline (who was pitching some charity stuff).  He told a story of when they were first starting out and Delta (maybe United or the like?) wouldn’t sign up until they checked out Priceline from top to bottom.  The person doing the due dilligance for the airline said “we like situations where it is a win/win”  the founder said “great! we look fwd to working with you!”  The airline guys says to him, “no, you misunderstand.  We like to win twice.  If we can find a way to do this ourselves we will and not have to pay you anything.”    Ah capitalism!  Of course they beleived in themselves and we know where they are now and where the airlines are now. 

  • Jake

    Hello James, could you write about your run-in with the IRS that you’ve alluded to in this and couple other posts?

  • Mike Nadel

    When I stumble on Mr. Ed on Nick At Nite or some other channel and watch a few minutes of it, I’m struck by two things: 1. As dated as it is, it’s pretty darn funny — funnier than most stuff that passes for TV comedy today. 2. Wilbur’s wife Carol was extremely attractive — sexy even — and they didn’t try to hide it.

    As for Cap’n Crunch, eating that gravel used to turn the roof of my mouth into mincemeat!

    Ah, the good old days!

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      You know, I’m going to have to check out Mr Ed now

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      You know, I’m going to have to check out Mr Ed now

  • Ed O’Brien

    Thank you for your blog. I found if through Penelope Trunk’s blog.

    I printed out your daily practices blog, laminated it, and put it up in my shower. That way I have to look at it ever day. It has helped, when I do follow it.

    Thank you

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      thats a great idea! I should do that also. 

    • http://jamesaltucher.com James Altucher

      thats a great idea! I should do that also. 

  • Mark May

    James Altucher you seem to have a lot of fun in your life.
    You seem to have fun winning and losing (and making comments at dinner parties).
    I teach mathematics.
    I plan to teach my students some of your “stuff”

    I might call it… SIX THINGS YOU NEED

  • Kevin M

    This is great stuff. For me it took awhile to find A) and now I struggle with B) but there are systems you can put in place to help with that somewhat. A) you can’t fake.

  • Roland

    Yes, fulfillment in serving your customers, patients, clients.  They’re better off and so are we.  James, whenever your writing becomes whiny, I just say – stay with him.  He’s figuring out how to say what he needs to say.  And you always do.  Rashkinar!

  • lc manoj

    Good one!! I live in Bangalore and social networking is big here. We may not have the same number of meetings and fancy Do’s as NYC but nearly every urban man/woman is trying to be the influencer on twitter, fb and the blog world, I included. Got some old world wisdom yesterday – I was busy tweeting using my phone, my mom sees it and asks me to explain twitter to her, and I explain. After listening to the explanation, she nods and says “I’d rather you read a book instead of playing with your phone”

  • Brian Balk

    I don’t think the lines you quoted from Mr. Ed are sexist – but they antagonize a conservative view of marriage / fidelity.  Here’s a test on the sexist side:  Suppose Mrs. Post finds herselt a talking mare, Ms. Edwina, who suggests that they go out and find themselves some young studs.  If you think that would be okay for the misters but not for the misses (or vice versa), then you’re sexist.  If you think it’s fine for both, or not fine, either way, then that says something about your view of relationships.

    Great commentary on requirements of success.  Wish I was anywhere close to having those characteristics.  Need to read more, and try implementing your daily practice.

  • Brian Balk

    I don’t think the lines you quoted from Mr. Ed are sexist – but they antagonize a conservative view of marriage / fidelity.  Here’s a test on the sexist side:  Suppose Mrs. Post finds herselt a talking mare, Ms. Edwina, who suggests that they go out and find themselves some young studs.  If you think that would be okay for the misters but not for the misses (or vice versa), then you’re sexist.  If you think it’s fine for both, or not fine, either way, then that says something about your view of relationships.

    Great commentary on requirements of success.  Wish I was anywhere close to having those characteristics.  Need to read more, and try implementing your daily practice.